murderwhitepeople:

micdotcom:

Young British Muslims tell the Islamic State: #NotInMyName

There’s a new trend taking over the social media pages of young British Muslims, and it’s targeted right at the Islamic State. 

As Mic has previously reported, there’s something troubling about calling this terrorist group the “Islamic State,” since they do not accurately represent Islam or Islamic beliefs, but a twisted and perverted interpretation of the global religion. 

So to combat this, young activists, led by Britain’s Active Change charity, are telling the terrorists to stop acting under the banner of Islam by circulating the hashtag #NotInMyName and calling out the group for “hiding behind a false Islam.”

The message is clear | Follow micdotcom 

I am so fucking sick of this

I am sick to fucking death of it

I’m sick of the fact that western islamophobia has reached such a stage that Muslims have to constantly reassure you bigots that we’re not terrorists and don’t go home planning to bring down western society any time there is any self-styled jihadist group starts committing the most unspeakable atrocities.

Why do we have to do this?

Why?

Every single fucking time, we have to actively denounce every single bomb and every single bullet fired in the Muslim world lest it be used as proof of our inherent violence and brutality. 

We don’t want to do this; we don’t want to engage in these kinds of campaigns and don’t want to have to constantly reassure you close-minded fucks that we have no plans for violent proselytisation.

This is YOUR damn problem. It’s YOUR fault that you can’t look at us without seeing terrorists. 

I’m sick of apologetically pandering to non-Muslims in the west and I’m sick of being expected to be constantly wearing a hangdog expression whenever this happens.

YOU are the bigots that create fear and paranoia around Muslims and around Muslims exclusively.

Where is the call for every single Sri Lankan to denounce the Tamil Tigers?

Are the Irish constantly demanded to apologise for the actions of the IRA in the past?

Is every single Jewish person called upon to actively criticise Israel for one of the longest running genocides of modern times?

Which other group is considered to be little more than a group of pseudo-sleeper agents waiting to pounce upon the ‘hospitality’ of western nations and usher in a world where non-Muslims are treated as Muslims are treated now?

I am sick to the absolute back teeth of you people.

(via reverseracism)

mangomamita:

edwardsheerran:

andthatlittleblackdress:

honestly sometimes in school people say the most ridiculous shit and I make this face and look somewhere at an imaginary camera like I’m on The Office

My school has security cameras in every classroom and I’ve done this at least 3 times each class this entire year. Today the security guard came up to me and told me I was his hero. 

image

(via portrait-d-unefemme)

meristem:

i feel like if oikawa ever met aliens he would tell them all about volleyball and his best friend iwa-chan

(via oldmenyaoi)

thymoss:

railroadsoftware:

no one ever says that Rome needed help from aliens to build their empire

#l laughed for days when i found out that #ancient egyptians used water to reduce friction and move blocks for distances #and that this was literally DEPICTED ON THEIR HIEROGLYPHICS #but ~western archaeologists~ #thought that the pouring of water depicted ~superstitious rituals~ #jfc

(via reverseracism)

Anonymous asked:
BRUH WHY IS MY VAGINA BURNING?

lordbape:

cause u got that bomb pussy 💣 (consult your doctor)

tw-koreanhistory:

The Balangiga Bell, on display at the 2nd ID Museum at Camp Red Cloud, South Korea.

Please can we have our bells back? Philippine town asks U.S.

In the devastated coastal Philippine town of Balangiga, a Roman Catholic belfry with a maroon steeple rises from the rubble, a battered symbol of resistance for a people with mixed feelings about the U.S. military now helping them survive.

After one of the world’s most powerful typhoons roared across the central Philippines and killed more than 4,000 people, U.S. military helicopters are flying in aid to desperate regions such as this once-picturesque fishing village of 12,600 people in ravaged Samar province.

It was here 112 years ago that one of the darkest chapters of American colonialism began: the island-wide massacre by U.S. soldiers of thousands of Filipinos, including women and children, in response to the killing of 48 U.S. soldiers by rebels.

After months of bloodshed, animosity has festered for more than a century over the ultimate insult: seizure of the town’s church bells by U.S. troops. In recent years, the Philippine government has demanded their return.

Marciano Deladia, a chief aide to the mayor, and other residents are thankful for the U.S. packets of rice and other food. “But we want our bells back,” he said.

The town built the belfry in 1998 in the hope that the United States would return three bells it says were stolen as trophies during the 1899-1902 Philippine-American War. One is believed to have been rung to signal the start of the attack.

Two of the bells are at the Warren Air Force Base in Wyoming. The third is part of a travelling museum now at a base in South Korea.

The dispute over the Balangiga bells underscores the difficulty the United States will face in transforming goodwill over its aid to typhoon victims into a bigger military presence on the ground in the Philippines.

Although the two countries are close allies, mistrust still lingers over America’s previous role as the Philippines’ colonial master, as well as its longtime support for the brutal and kleptocratic regime of the former dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

The belfry is among just a few buildings still intact after Super Typhoon Haiyan killed 14 people in Balangiga, where a well-organized evacuation plan kept fatalities low.

"We don’t have any animosity against the American people," said Deladia, standing in front of a monument recreating the ambush of U.S. troops. But the bells, he said, are "part of our historical heritage".

Every September 28 the town re-enacts the 1901 Balangiga “incident” in which 48 occupying U.S. soldiers died in an ambush at the old church that triggered retaliation in which U.S. forces razed homes and killed thousands.

Read More: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/11/21/us-philippines-typhoon-usa-idUSBRE9AK1CO20131121

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

"

He is taking a course on Marxist ideology.
He says, “The only real solution is to smash the system and start again.”
His thumb is caressing the most bourgeois copy of the communist manifesto that I have ever seen,
He bought it at Barnes and Noble for twenty-nine U.S. American dollars and ninety-nine cents,
Its hard cover shows a dark man with a scarved face
Waving a gigantic red flag against a fictional smoky background.
The matte finish is fucking gorgeous.
He wants to be congratulated for paying Harvard sixty thousand dollars
To teach him that the system is unfair.
He pulls his iPhone from his imported Marino wool jacket, and leaves.

What people can’t possibly tell from the footage on TV
Is that the water cannon feels like getting whipped with a burning switch.
Where I come from, they fill it with sewer water and hope that they get you in the face with your mouth open
So that the hepatitis will keep you in bed for the next protest.
What you can’t tell from Harvard square,
Is that when the tear gas bursts from nowhere to everywhere all at once,
It scrapes your insides like barbed wire, sawing at your lungs.
Tear gas is such a benign term for it,
If you have never breathed it in you would think it was a nostalgic experience.
What you can’t learn at Barnes and Noble,
Is that when they rush you, survival is to run,
I am never as fast as when the police are chasing me.
I know what happens to women in the holding cells down there and yet…
We still do it.

I inherited my communist manifesto,
It has no cover—
Because my mother ripped it off when she hid it in the dust jacket of “Don Quixote”
The day before the soldiers destroyed her apartment,
Looking for subversive propaganda.
She burned the cover, could not bring herself to burn the pages,
Hoped to God the soldiers couldn’t read,
They never found it.
So she was not killed for it, but her body bore the scars of the torture chamber,
For wanting her children to have a better life than she did,
Don’t talk to me about revolution.

I know what the price of smashing the system really is, my people already tried that.
The price of uprise is paid in blood,
And not Harvard blood.
The blood that ran through the streets of Santiago,
The blood thrown alive from Argentine helicopters into the Atlantic.

It is easy to say “revolution” from the comfort of a New England library.

It is easy to offer flesh to the cause,
When it is not yours to give.

"

Catalina Ferro, “Manifesto” (via dialecticsof)

I feel like people do need to remember that there is a very real, very painful, very human element to the word “revolution”.

(via nuanced-subversion)

(Source: sincerely-the-end, via talesofthestarshipregeneration)